Pages

Claife Heights

Claife Heights

Route Information

Stats: 15 miles

OS Map:

Refreshments

Rather than waiting for an age to cross on the ferry by car, we suggest parking at Windermere and cycling down and across. It’s a lot cheaper this way, and will save you up to an hour each way in summer. Windermere has loads of facilities. Hawkshead has some lovely tea shops and cafes, and a few pubs if that takes your fancy. Grizedale visitor centre is also a good place to get a bite to eat and a drink.

Character

Once you decide to ride hard in the Lakes there are no real warm-up sections. It’s uphill, so accept it and enjoy. This route typifies that, as you climb on tarmac towards the tracks that take you across Claife Heights, before sweeping descents on hard packed and well drained tracks lead you down again. Take a break in Hawkshead, before climbing up into Grizedale, enjoy the North Face Trail, before again going off-piste and dropping down to the Lake at the Windermere ferry. Albeit short, the climbs and descents will make this one of the best rides that you’ll do all year.


Route

1. Having crossed the ferry, head along the road towards Sawrey, twisting and climbing until a bridleway is reached on the right, just before the Sawrey Hotel. Take this and climb on a slate track, passing the Sawrey institute, and ascend Claife Heights.

2. Passing meadows, you eventually reach woodland and descend at speed on a rocky track to the lake shore. Follow the track along the shore until a bridleway on the left takes you up again onto the heights at Belle Grange. A large laurel bush adjescent to this BW may help identify it.

3. This BW climbs on a good but somewhat cobbled surface, before becoming more technical, with rock steps on steep ground to negotiate. Crossing strainght over two other BWs in sequence, the descent begins, requiring good balance and line choice, speeding you down all the way towards Hawkshead.

4. Suitably refreshed, cycle up through the village, passing the Kings Arms and Minstrels Gallery Tea Rooms to your left, cycling under the arch and up towards the excellent BW that leads you to Grizedale Forest. This steep track is well surfaced, and if taken in the right gear is easily ridden without a bikehike. It will get you up into the forest quickly, avoiding tarmac, joining the North Face Trail.

5. As the BW enters the forest proper, continue uphill on the track for approx 1/4 mile, before taking the North Face Trail to the left. This should be followed all the way to the Moor Top car park.

6. From Moor Top, take the tarmac road through the forest for a short distance, before signs lead you into the forest again to the left. Keep on the forest track, going right at the first fork of tracks, and following this for some distance as it weaves through the trees and around. Left at the next junction, and as the track curves around, a BW sign towards the end of the curve and to the left signs you onto some great off-piste, which weavs through the trees and speeds you downhill again. This track is excellent, steep and somewhat technical in places. However, be careful not to take the other nearby more direct track down. it is not as enjoyable.

7. Exiting onto tarmac from Low Scar Wood, turn right and cycle along the singletrack road for a short distance, picking up the BW off to the left (almost opposite) and heading down through trees. Joining a good tarmac road, turn right and cycle along, passing the junction to the left, before taking a BW at the edge of trees on the left, which leads down towards Cunsey. As the final piece of off-road for the day, this is a superb short trail, with sections to enjoy at speed as you pick your line over rocks, before exiting onto the road by a bridge and heading back to the ferry.





click below for gpx files

Breasthigh Road

Breasthigh Road

Route Information

Stats: 9 miles and 1700 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Start point: Just before Roundthwaite, there’s a pull-in on the right. Or you could start at the A6 end. It’s your ride.

Refreshments
Tebay is your nearest commerce. Junction 38 services or The Cross Keys.

Character

Lovers of solitude will enjoy this one.

The mileage is only in single figures (you can extend it either south to join forces with The Other Borrowdale or venture north to make an ‘eight’ around Bretherdale and Nan Hill) But don’t be lured into complacency – there is plenty of climbing and plenty of tricky terrain to negotiate. There are no easy miles in these ‘ere parts. In our case, the intended ‘eight’ was cut short by a tumble on the decent into Bretherdale that left both bike and rider requiring medical attention.
‘Breasthigh’ is actually a double misnomer. First, because of the connotations of softness and smoothness. In reality, this pass is rough. Really rough. Start with the obvious simile of the badger’s arse. Now imagine a particularly unfastidious badger, after a night out on Poppadums and Jalfrezi, equipped only with a rusty rasp file for personal hygiene. It’s rougher than that.

As a consequence, the second impression, that of sinking in chest-deep mud, is also false. The pass is all stone-based so mire is not an issue. Parts of the first leg, over Roundthwaite Common, however, could be marshy after a damp spell.

One notable feature of the area is the profusion of wildflower meadows – huge, dizzying expanses of buttercups, campions and dog-daisies. You should see skittish wild horses on the heights, among the meadow pipits and wheatear. In Borrowdale, look out (and listen out) for stonechats tocking alarm from the gorse and bracken.


Route

1. There’s a good Bridleway sign, saying “Borrowdale” just before the farm. No, they don’t mean that Borrowdale. Climb, initially steeply, to the left of a tight stand of sycamore. Pick up a good track, surprisingly dry, up the flank of Jeffrey’s Mount, with a fine retrospective of the Balamory colours of Tebay

2. Where the wall turns 90 degrees right and a track veers up to the left, go straight ahead. There’s a small water splash with a tough but short climb beyond.

3. The track loses some of its identity here, so be prepared to strike a sou’westerly bearing, crossing the ridge to the left of Belt Howe.

4. Rollick on stony zig-zags down to Borrowdale.

5. Head up the valley. The map would have you believe you can keep to the northern (true left) bank but it’s easier to cross at the obvious bridge and follow the south bank to the stepping stones. Either cross these or splash the ford.

6. It’s a tough climb but surprisingly do-able as long as you can maintain traction on the rubble. It doesn’t go on as long as you might think, either.

7. There now follows a really stony descent into the seldom seen valley of Bretherdale. Watch out for this descent – I came a purler here and am currently nursing a number of injuries.

8. Trundle down the valley and turn right at the end for the short climb up Pikestone Lane back to the start.





click below for gpx file

Black Combe

Black Combe

Route Information

Stats: Only 8.6 miles but don’t underestimate because, well, look at that climb profile – 2,345 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Tha’s in West Coombria na’ tha’ kna’s. Cum wi’ packed lunch. Although, after your ride, you could pootle into Bootle.

Character

The residents of North Lancashire are used to the swell of Black Combe looming over the sands of Morecambe Bay. On hazier days, it is the only Cumbrian Hill on offer, the only sign that there’s an Atlantis out beyond the smirr. On a clear day, it looks close enough to touch – a cruel deception as it takes the motorist a circuitous hour and a half to get to its base from, say, Heysham.

But that motorist will be well-rewarded for his or her pains, for this oddball outlier is a fine hill. There’s more than a passing resemblance to the Howgills – you can see it in the smooth, feminine outline. You can see it in the rich swathes of bracken and heather swaddling the lower slopes. You’ll see it in the contours, clustering together like cables in a conduit. A geologist will tell you that both are made of Ordovician rocks made over 400 million years ago.

You’ll need to pack your lungs – much of the climbing will have you simultaneously screaming for a lower gear and wrestling the front wheel back down. But the route is easy to follow and is all rideable apart from a section at 200m that would challenge the toughest climber. The descent is a riot – soft, peaty turf that looks ready to forgive the odd, unplanned trip over the bars. Not that that’s likely as there are few tyre-traps in evidence


Route

If progressing by car, the best start point is probably the junction of the A595 and A5093, just outside Silecroft. There’s a handy layby right by the junction. Alternatively, you could get yourself way out west by train, getting off at Silecroft station.

1. Head up the hill (A595) towards Barrow for ¼mile, then take lane on left, tarmacked but with luxuriant mounds of grass in the middle. This gradually becomes rougher and a sign invites you to take the bridleway up the fellside to your right. Steel yourself. You are now barely 60m above sea level and the summit is ten times that. The track climbs on a wide swathe of grass between rich seas of bracken. The gradient lets up – a bit – when you get to 300m and you can cast an eye over your shoulder at the beaten-pewter sea. This gives it a very different feel from other Cumbrian rides – very remote and maritime.

2. Lungs and legs will enjoy the respite at the top, and a chance to look north at the unusual angle of the Eskdale Horseshoe – seeing old friends in a new light.

3. As you head north, there’s a sudden change in soil type, being dramatically marshier than the climb. On a hot day, this has a welcome cooling effect on scalding calves, but may be a cause for considering a whale-tail when the day is cold. Pay close attention to the diverging tracks – the bridleway heads north a little then veers northwest down a grassy ridge with the deep declivity of William Gill on your left. Again, the terrain is very like the Howgills but the coastal position gives it a completely different feel.

4. Plummet down to a big zigzag (ignore the direct route as its liable to carve in damp conditions) and gain a slanting track by a fence-line (lower down this becomes a drystone wall). The track is rather deep with bents grasses, so the choice of line is a little vague. You just need to have faith that there aren’t any big boulders or hidden drops lurking in there, looking for a front wheel to snatch.

5. The track improves and morphs into a delightful switchback along the flank of the fell, keeping to the intake boundary and splashing through a couple of streams. In high summer, the colours on the fellside above are beautiful, with yellow gorse and lime-green grass yielding to intermingled bands of bracken and heather as richly coloured as a cock-pheasant’s back. All too soon, you converge with the A595 and a somewhat prosaic spin back to Silecroft. Yes, it was a long journey to get here, but it was worth it, wasn’t it?





click below for gpx file

Ambleside Eight

Ambleside Eight

Route Information

Stats: 19 miles and 2,300 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Lots of potential. Ambleside includes Lucy’s, the Apple Pie and Zeffirelli’s. There’s also Chesters by the River at Skelwith Bridge and the Mortal Man (a bit off route) at Troutbeck. The Outgate Inn is well worth a look.

Character

A superb double-loop around Ambeside’s environs. As every mathematician knows, the beauty of eight is that it can easily be halved so, if you’re short of time or breath, either of these loops would be a pleasant outing. Don’t be deterred by the stretches of roadwork – they are either on quiet lanes (e.g. Holbeck Lane) or Cumbria County Council has thoughtfully provided cycleways (eg the stretch of B5286 from Brathay to Angle Wood).


Route

1. Head out of Ambleside on the A593 following signs to Coniston. There’s a footpath-cum-cycleway on the left.

2. At Clappersgate, branch left to Hawkshead, swooping over the River Brathay and rising steadily to the fork left at Angle Wood (signposted to Wray & Wray Castle)

3. Easily-missed. There’s a bridleway (signposted to Outgate) on the right (ornate gate) where the road bends to the left. If you get to the beck, where the turn to the campsite is, you’ve gone too far)

4. Follow the delightful singletrack alongside the seldom-seen Blelham Tarn, with interest.

5. At Outgate, turn left past the inn. After a mile or so, take the right turn (so long as your handlebars are less than 6’6″ wide) to Knipe Fold.

6. Turn left at Knipe Fold, then immediately hard right on the byway to Oxen Fell.

7. Turn right in the woods and break out into a fantastic view over the Brathay scene. Undulate broadly northwards, finishing in a fast descent (but note the signs asking riders to keep to the track and not carve up the grass)

8. Turn right at the road and swoop down to Skelwith Bridge, taking the slight detour of the byway on the right.

9. Climb on tarmac past Neaum Crag campsite to turn right to Ellers Brow, then pick up the great bridleway skirting the southern slopes of Loughrigg Fell. This culminates in a fast descent to Under Loughrigg road (turn right at the bottom then left over the packhorse bridge) to return to Ambleside.

10. Still got some zing? Good. Trundle south on the A591 as far as the Brockhole visitor centre. There’s cycleway for most of the way and the views over the lake are justly celebrated.

11. Easy to miss. Turn left up Mirk Lane at a bus shelter. Climb past a horsey house with good signage, up a scrabbly lane to join Holbeck Lane and tarmac.

12. Turn right at the top and then soon branch right again down a narrow bridleway. Go down to a wooded dell and up steep grassy slopes beyond to the main Troutbeck road (A592).

13. Turn left and descend to the church. Turn left just after the chuchyard onto a stone-based bridleway.

14. At the top, turn left then right at the Post Office. Climb up Robin Lane, branching left at a double gate after a mile or so. The view from this balcony are superb.

15. Drop on singletrack to a bridge, then climb to the right to the farm.

16. The descent through the woods to Ambleside is a fitting end to a fine excursion.



click below for gpx file

Wensleydale Wanderer

Wensleydale Wanderer

Route Information

Stats: 15 miles and 1318 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Ample village pubs in the area to choose from, together with the nearby cafe at the National Park Visitor Centre at Aysgarth down the road.
On the way back, stop off at Castle Bolton for tea and cake.

Character
The fact that we did this route in winds of between 30 and 40 mph on the fells, on a early January day should convince all of you that this is indeed a route for all seasons. It traverses the hills of splendid Wensleydale, peaking over into Swaledale, before an epic descent of Peatmoor Lane.

This and the ‘Carpeby *’ route would make an excellent trip north for anyone. Two huts along the route provide excellent halts for a butty and flask (you’ll have to carry I’m afraid). The tracks are a mix of sandy grit, rock and meadowland.


Route

1. Park at the far end of Preston Under Scar, then climbing up the road between Pasture Wood and Condenser Wood. At the cross roads, go straight over and onto the well surfaced double track that leads up and onto the high moorland meadows and escarpment. Albeit climbing, this is a steady gradient which allows you time to relax and enjoy the views, as you roll along.

2. Join the tarmac above Hargill Lane, turning right and uphill towards the Apedale Road some 400 yards ahead and to the left. Cycle onto the Apedale Road and then roll down, heading towards the hut at the track junction, then turning left and climbing back towards Wensleydale.

3. This track climbs and then rolls down before climbing again to the Greenhaw shooting Hut above Wensleydale – toilets at the back and some tables and chairs make this a great spot to stop and rest. Then the real fun begins, on a fast and twisting rocky descent – speed is your friend here – all the way down via Peatmoor Lane towards Thoralby. However…do not descent all the way! At the bridleway junction left, take this track (BW) and cycle across good moorland meadows towards Castle Bolton, finally speeding down to the Castle for tea and cake.

4. Follow East Lane, crossing the tarmac at Sissy Bank and back to Preston Under Scar.




click below for gpx file

Swaledale Valley and Pinseat

Swaledale Valley and Pinseat

Route Information

Stats: 23 miles and 3080 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

All you need at the Dales Bike Centre, plus nearby Reeth. Grinton Lodge Youth Hostel is also nearby. Around the route you could pop in for a brew at Gunnerside where there’s a good cafe.

Character

A route with good climbs on road and trail and an great descent on the hard but loose tracks down Pinseat. Flowing tracks along the river make this a great and steady day out and a super intro to riding Swaledale.


Route

1. Head out of the centre and turn right towards Grinton. Go over the bridge and as the road bends to the left, take the junction ahead, climbing the steep tarmac road all the way to the top, to open country and Grinton Youth Hostel

2. At the fork in the road take the right fork signed Redmire, then head onto the moor through a gate, keeping on the main bridleway that heads due west, across Harkerside Moor.

This rises and drops, and twists and turns on loose gravel, giving a lovely ride, with fantastic views over the valley towards Reeth.

3. Keep on this main track all the way to a large track junction, near lead mines at Whitaside Moor. Keep left, turning uphill towards ‘Morley’s Folly’ (OS map).

4. At the junction of tracks at the ‘Apedale Road’, turn right and descend the track to the road, turning right onto the road for a short distance. A farm on the left of the road has a BW and rocky stream running down beside it. Turn off left and descend this excellent track beside the winding wall and into the steep meadow to the valley bottom. Where it goes through a gate into the lane, turn left and follow the track / lane to the bridge, going over the river and turning right into Low Row.

5. Climb steadily for a short distance before a forked track off to the left and behind (by old sheds/ garages) takes you up and over to High Smarber where walls and meadows lead you to the heather clad steep moorland singletrack (tricky navigation initially, but improves significantly). Follow the singletrack for 1 mile, then linking in to a well -made moorland track which leads up to the old mine workings at Moor House. Turn right at the track junction and descend to the next track junction where a right turn will take you down at speed on loose gravel to Surrender Bridge.

6. Turn right at the bridge, where a short and testing ascent of the road towards Low Row, is rewarded with a fast and steep descent, so take care and modulate your brakes to keep the speed safe. Once at Low Row, re-cross the Swale at the Bridge and turn left now onto the same bridleway as before, this time staying alongside the river as the bridleway rolls steadily, joins tarmac for a short period at Low Witha, before taking you back down to the river on an excellent bridleway down to Stubbin Farm (OS Map) and along mixed ground all the way to the bridge at Grinton.

7. Finish back at the Dales Bike Centre for a brew and cake.




click below for gpx file

Moresdale Road Swaledale

Moresdale Road,  Swaledale

Route Information

Stats: 18 miles, 2468 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Start at the Dales MTB centre for the best facilities; a bike shop, toilets, cafe, and even a bunkhouse if you want to stay over – great pubs in Reeth, with great grub.

Character

A cracking route that’ll show off the very best of Swaledale riding,with steep climbs and great descents.


Route

1. From the Dales MTB Centre, head up the road to Reeth. At Reeth market place take the road out to Langthwaite climbing steadily out of the village and over the cattle grid. 1km after the grid you need to look out for a double track on your left climbing steeply up the moor. Follow this track above Riddings Farm and drop down to Thirns, turn right and take the next track on the right as it climbs steadily. Follow this track and just after the wall on the left stops there is a crossroads of tracks – bear right towards a post and follow this single track bridleway as it climbs the side of Cringley Hill and then drops down to Fore Gill Gate – go through the gate and turn right onto the road.

2. Follow the road for 0.5km and a double track bridleway is signed on your left – follow this as it gains even more height. Just before the top on the right another track heads off above some trees – take this and have a breather on the first bit of flat trail so far! Once past the trees look out for a rocky track on the right – this track is a zig zag descent through the hushes – its fast and loose with plenty of sharp stones to puncture on but great fun. This will bring you out onto the Langthwaite – Tan Hill road where you need to turn right.

3. Go down the road and take the first road on the left, crossing Stang Bridge and then climb for about 2km on the road, ignore the first bridleway sign on the right and keep on until you see a double track on the right – take this and it rises steadily with cliffs on your left and a great view of Arkengarthdale on the right. After a short sharp climb the track forks – take the left to the top of Windegg Vein. Follow this track, the Moresdale Road, across the moor.

4. About 1km after the shooting hut turn right on the double track and enjoy a short descent. The track regains a bit of height but then starts a steady drop to Schoolmaster Pasture – engage big ring and enjoy.

5. Turn right on the road and take the tarmac to Washfold and straight on at the crossroads up to Hurst. After some cottages on your right there is a gate on the left with a track climbing alongside some spoil heaps – take this up to another gate – once through the gate its a steady climb on a rough track across Marrick Moor to another gate. Go through the gate and enjoy the view before dropping down Fremington Edge – either of the tracks from the gate will get you down – rough to the left, fast to the right. Halfway down a gate stops the fun – just hang back from the fast one to give them chance to open it for you! The rough track joins tarmac but is still entertaining.

6. Follow the road down through some trees and as the road bends left, turn right down a short boulder strewn trail where it comes out beside a house. Turn right and drop to the main road. If you parked in Reeth turn right and you will be there in a couple of minutes – turn left for the Dales Centre.




click below for gpx file

Mastiles Lane

Mastiles Lane

Route Information

Stats: 14 miles (there and back)

OS Map:

Character

This is an absolutely terrific route at all times of the year. In the past two years I’ve done the route with snow lying on the very top; in the rainy autumn, where we got soaked after only 10 minutes, and a mate refused to let me eat on the way around, stating ‘eating is cheating!’ And I’ve done it on glorious sunny days, with the open dales spread before me.

It’s only the distance that makes this a borderline route. If you extended it to Settle, it’s definitely a hard route. So when you finish, head into the pub at Kilnsey for a good meal.

You can also add this route to numerous other routes, such as the famous ‘Settle Loop’

Refreshments

Park at the cattle grid if in small numbers. Alternatively park at Kilnsey Park, where a good restaurant awaits at the end. For me, I’d choose the Tennant Arms for food every time. Accommodation is ample nearby, with Kettlewell Youth Hostel for the budget conscious.


Route

1. Turn off the road behind the pub at Kilnsey and drive up the steep lane, parking at the start of Mastiles Lane, by the steel gate. The initial climb is on tarmac, allowing you to warm up. Go through the gate and onto the rough bridleway.

2. Follow this as is gently rises and falls for a short distance, before your eyes lead you to the dramatic incline in the distance. Head up the bridleway as it climbs for about 2 miles of hard graft before easing off a bit. The track then falls as you enjoy the first really fast, twisting descent. Go through a series of gates as you follow the bridleway on good ground. After the ‘Roman Fort’ marked on the OS map, a descent takes you across bumpy ground, through a gate and across a deep ford before a tricky rocky climb.

3. The track eases and leads to a field gate as you complete Mastiles Lane. Go through this gate and turn right, following the fast track as it descends, across a cattle grid before turning left by a small copse and following the track to Malham Tarn.

4. Cycle around the tarn, past Tarn House and down the drive to a point by a gatehouse with a track junction marked on the left. Take this track which has wetlands to the left of a drystone wall, until it meets the road.

5. Turn left and follow this road to a junction, turning left and heading back to the end/ start of Mastiles lane.

Now reverse the lane all the back to Kilnsey. The final descent is one of the best you’ll find anywhere in England. This route has several extensions: The Settle Loop or a drop down into

Malham followed by a return via Gordale.

If you’re going to Settle, then the Three Peaks Bike Shop is one of the very best anywhere in the UK, with a superb cafe too.




click below for gpx file

Langthwaite MTB

Langthwaite MTB

Route Information

Stats: 9.4 miles

OS map:

Refreshments

The best place for good facilities is Reeth, with ample accommodation choices and places to eat. Grinton Youth Hostel is superb, but is beaten in my view by the Dales Mountain Bike Centre at Low Fremington. Stuart and company will also fix up your bike for you. If you do stay in the area, keep this for an evening outing. At the end, head for the 18th Century ‘Charles Bathurst Inn’, for an excellent meal. If you fancy a bit more comfort for sleeping, then the rooms at the Inn are great.

Character

A 2 hour ride up and over Swaledale moorlands with steep ascents & descents, starting with a killer climb. Initially on tarmac, as the narrow lane twists and turns, it joins the rough moorland tracks through a gate on the left hand side of the lane near what you hope to be the top.

However, although easing off, it continues to climb until respite is gained with superb views all around. It is an excellent introduction into Swaledale biking. It takes in some superb scenery…if you can catch your breath enough to enjoy it!

Albeit steep, if possible, the climbs are best done in the middle ring. The descents will more than make up for the climbs. Remember that speed is your friend and enjoy what Swaledale has to offer.


Route

1. Start at the pub car park at Langthwaite (grid 99950320) and head down the road to the junction, turning left and up the hill towards the bridleway at grid 02450090.

2. Go over Peat Moor Green to the track junction and head east past St Andrews Cross to the Moresdale Road (track). The steep climbs are rewarded with a terrific descent across the moor that will make your eyes water! Check the brakes before you begin the descent. This is definitely fast and furious – hold on and enjoy!

3. Drop down the goat’s road into Washfold village, going west and through the village onto Hurst, joining the track heading west.

4. Continuing along the bridleway west, towards Langthwaite. This descends Fremington Edge, with a technical rocky section. beware of hidden dangers here. Rocks will spring out at you from within the grassy meadow.
A final sweeping walled lane will lead to a well-earned finish.




click below for gpx file

Kirkby Malzeard Moor

Kirkby Malzeard Moor

Route Information

Stats: 16 miles

OS map link:

Refreshments

This is a great loop route starting and finishing in the pretty village of Kirby Malzeard. In the village there is a butchers, shop and a pub/tandoori restaurant if that takes your fancy.
Kirkby Malzeard is a great place for mountain biking, but has a limited amount of accommodation to choose from. Nearby Masham has a greater choice and flexibility, whilst remaining close to lots of rides. However, for snacks, the butchers and deli at Kirkby Malzeard really does take some beating. Oh, and the pub has a great curry house inside – honest!

Character

The mountain biking in this route is superb, tarmac lanes leading into rocky but well defined track around Kirby Malzeard Moor. In the west of the ride you will see dramatic views of the high end of Nidderdale into Middlesmoor and Scar House.


Route

1. Park up in Kirby Malzeard. The Main street provides ample parking throughout the day and the shop is close by at the top of the Main Street.

2. Head west out of the village onto Greystone Head. This lane is good tarmac road with a steep but short climb with a forest to your right. The lane eventually stops at Dallowgill, by a parking area and stream. Continue onto the unmade lane. Going initially is ok but it will soon become quite rocky and better MTB terrain.

3. Through a gate and down the slope, taking the right fork at the next track junction. Rough track with shooting traps on your right hand side. Through later months there will be shooting parties moving through fields.

4. At the next fork take the left hand lane down into the dip and bridge, and up the other side to another junction in the tracks. This junction, I find, is about half way and a good place for a break.

5. Continue east along the descent track towards the pinnacle of Kirby Malzeard Moor at 359m. The track becomes straight and fast as you drop over the other side.

6. A fast descent awaits, but keep looking for the fork to the right, passing tracks to the left on the way. At times of the year it can be slightly hidden in the heather. If you are enjoying the fast descent too much you may miss it.Not a problem – just keep going and look for the next right turn onto Brown bank Road. If you have managed to see the fork take the right track and keep travelling down through the heather to Newlands House and through the farm yard.

7. Follow Brown Bank Road onto Kirk Bank, east back into Kirby Malzeard. A fast descent down the good tarmac road and an enjoyable end to your ride. Plenty of pubs in the village for a pint.




click below for gpx file