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Wold Newton

Wold Newton

Route Information

Stats:  10 miles and 650 feet of ascent

OS Map: Refreshments

Plenty of parking around the village of Wold Newton. The Anvil Arms serves lunchtime food Sat and Sunday and some evening meals. Advisable to check beforehand. Yorkshire Wolds Gallery has a café at Willerby Wold farm open Weds to Sunday 10am to 4pm.

Character

A 10 mile route along rolling lanes, starting and finishing at Wold Newton Village. 650 foot of ascent, to give you a taste of the riding in this great area. One for the family.


Route

1. From Wold Newton, take Front Street, which is the road in front of the white corner house opposite the duck pond. The road makes its way up and past the church on the right.

2. Carry on the long ascent, to the crossroads marked with a white signpost and go straight on past the Trig Point 133m on the right. Then start the descent down to Fordon; it’s narrow here, so watch out for oncoming vehicle. The road drops to the small Chapel before the crossroads and to the ‘Give Way’ line.

3. Take a left at the crossroads and through the small hamlet of Fordon, and up another hill to reach a flat section of road which you follow for just over a mile, to reach Willerby Wold Farm (refreshment stop). The bigs hills are over!

4. The road reaches a crossroad with the busy B1249. Go straight on at the crossroads and onto a rough road which drops to Ganton Wold Farm, and take a left at the junction and follow this road to Foxholes, meeting the B1249 once again. Take a right onto the B1249 sign posted to Langtoft and Driffield. Cycle the short distance and turn left onto the Meadows, and follow the road around to the right, and then a left to take the road back along to Wold Newton.
Usually a nice following wind at this point for the last few miles back to the start point.




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Whitendale

Whitendale, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats:  6.5 miles

OS Map: Refreshments

Dunsop Bridge features a car park, toilets and Puddleducks cafe. If you have kids in the party, there’ll be plenty of time for a relaxed sit by the river feeding the ducks with duck food thoughtfully provided by the cafe.

Character

This is an ideal ride for a young family where the smaller members of the party can stretch their legs on tarmac but with negligible traffic. Consequently, we’ve listed it as both a road and MTB route but there’s no law against you doing it on a hybrid, a shopper or a penny farthing if that’s what takes your fancy.

If you need a USP to persuade the kids, bill this as a Journey to the Centre of the Earth. OK, a journey to the centre of the UK, anyway. If you cut out a map of the United Kingdom from plywood, the point of balance is Brennand Farm, our furthest point. Don’t listen to any Southerners who claim that Meriden, or Bedford are at the centre of things – Lancashire is where it all hinges.


Route

Straightforward from mapping




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Waddington Fell

Waddington Fell, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats:  10.5 miles and 1450 feet of ascent

OS Map: Refreshments

Pubs in Waddington, West Bradford and Grindleton.

Character

A pleasant double loop on the south-facing flank of Waddington Fell. It’s nowhere difficult, and either loop could be tackled individually. The turf can be soft at the top.


Route

1. Find somewhere out-of-the-way to park in West Bradford. Trundle along to Grindleton on the minor road and set off on the long climb up Main Street.

2. At the 181m spot-height, the main road veers right, with a curiously staggered signpost pointing to Slaidburn. Go straight ahead onto the minor lane.

3. At the bridleway sign, turn left. Cross a broken wall on your left and descend parallel to the valley.

4. At the T-junction at White Hall, turn right at a large house with a statue in a fountain. Descend pleasantly to the Grindleton-West Bradford Road again.

5. Turn right at the bottom and, as you go through West Bradford, turn right into Eaves Hall Lane which turns into Moor Lane as it climbs. You’ll soon come to a big sign announcing Seedall’s Farm – Bridleway only and the tarmac ends so the climbing gets a bit more interesting.

6. Ignore the footpath turning right and turn right at the top where the bridleway veers at 295 m.

7. Follow this line for two fields-worth, then turn right at an unmarked spot with marshy ground ahead and a ruin up on your left. Soon, you’ll see another ruin (photograph above) with a splendid view of Pendle Hill and bags of Bronte-esque atmosphere. Soon after, the trail dinks down to the left then zags sharply right.

8. The trail is indistinct on the ground but the key is to zag slightly more than you zigged. Cross the stream and follow a faint field boundary heading south-east. This soon becomes a strong track.

9. At the bottom, turn right on the road then look out for the bridleway sign forking away on the right. This is faint, gaining a slight causeway for a while. When the houses come into view, bear right and plunge down a fast, grassy slope to the start.




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Nappa Flats

Nappa Flats, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats:  7.2 miles and 540 feet of ascent

OS Map: Refreshments

Try the Buck Inn at Paythorne, where the route starts and finishes.

Character

A pastoral circuit of Lancashire’s Far East, with a brief skirmish into Yorkshire territory. The distinguishing features of this ride are captured in the two photos: rich hay meadows and a sporting crossing of the Ribble at Nappa Flats.

The terrain is generally easy but be prepared to navigate through unsigned territory and don’t expect to cross the stepping stones dryshod unless it hasn’t rained for thirty days straight or you are Danny MacAskill.


Route

1. There’s plenty of space opposite the Buck. Take the Pennine Bridleway eastwards, but go straight on where it veers 90 degrees to the left.

2. As you near England’s Head farm, turn left through the “Private Road” gate (the small gate at its side has a bridleway sign)

3. Keep to this line across several fields, passing to the right of the whitewashed buildings of Nappa Flats farm.

4. Drop down to the stepping stones and teeter across as best you can.

5. Go up the lane to the A682. Ignore the tempting looking track going straight on and turn right for 200m before turning left on bridleway.

6. Climb steeply from under the railway bridge on soft-going turf (Cow Gate Lane) The gradient soon eases to a grassy plateau.

7. On your left is a wooden repair to a stone wall that looks a bit like a double seat. At this gate, head towards Pendle Hill across a hay meadow (picture below).

8. Pick up a good lane and follow it SW to Hoober and down to the road.

9. Turn right on the road and follow it for 500m until there’s a bridleway (horse’s head sign) just after the road veers right.

10. Go through Painley Farm then, when the track gives out, cross pasture land heading for a railway bridge.

11. Go under the bridge. You should now see the A682 and your next bearing is the prominent bridleway coming down from the small hill in front.

12. At the road, turn north along the A682 (Pennine Bridleway sign). After a kilometre shadowing the road, veer left up a slight rise to a gate by the wooded tumulus of Castle Haugh.

13. Trundle north, overlooking the meanders of the Ribble, dropping down through woods to Paythorne Bridge and a short road climb back to the Buck.




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Lune Estuary

Lune Estuary Family Route, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats:  9.5 miles

OS Map: Refreshments

Cafe d’Lune at Conder Green at the start. Tel: 01524 752048 for opening hours. Sizeable car park has toilets. Lots of facilities in Lancaster at the furthest point.

Character

An ideal outing for small families at the tag-along or just-past-stabilisers stages. There and back for no navigation issues, a good surface throughout (which makes it suitable for MTB, hybid or reasonably robust road tyres) and, as it’s an old railway track, no climbing. This route is good for bird-watching, skirting the sands of the estuary. If you’re lucky with the turning of the tides, you’ll see fishermen setting huge nets across the river, sihouetted against the sparkling light like a scene from another century.


Route

The only part worthy of description is finding the start. There’s a car park tucked down Corricks Lane leading in front of the Stork Inn at Conder Green. Post code, for satnavvers, is LA2 0AN. Once on the trail, keep to the coastline and go as far as you like. You can join this route up with the continuation of the same railway line to Caton and Crook of Lune.




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Grizedale Lancashire

Grizedale, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats:  13 miles

OS Map:

Refreshments

Garstang is a great local town, small but friendly with good options.

Character

This is my staple ride from home so I guess I’m a tad biased. But, even after countless circuits, it’s a lovely jaunt when you can only get out for an hour on a Sunday morning. Better yet, on a summer’s evening, you’ll ride back up into the sun when the shadows have already settled on the coastal plain, giving the day a magical second wind. Come in March or April for the curlews and the lapwings. I’ve seen roe deer in the woods and, once, a red kite perched nonchalantly on top of one of the taller beeches.

Start Point: There’s a council car park at PR3 1EB (Grid Ref SD 493 454)


Route

1. Turn right at the mini roundabout and head north on the Lancaster Road for about ½mile, taking care not the exceed the 20mph limits.

2. Turn right at a pillar box into Wyre Lane. Follow this right to the end where you can choose between the ford (legal bridleway) and the footbridge (not so much) . Pick up the farm track skirting the river to the right.

3. At the farm junction, turn right through the farmyard and join the road at a duck pond, climbing gently over the M6 flyover. The racket of the traffic is soon left behind, and you’ll turn left into Keeper’s Lane, then left again into Higher Lane. Go over a tiny ford (more often dry) then take the right turn onto bridleway.

4. Follow this up the valley with increasing interest, past the reservoir and onto farmland. Ignore the concessionary path on your right.

5. When you reach the public road, ignore it and turn right towards Fell End Farm. Just before the farm, turn right onto their farm “bypass” – through a gate and sloping up through the field to regain the track. Follow this, climbing steadily. When it gets sketchy, contour until you can see a short swoop down to a beck. Head up to the road and turn right.

6. After a mile and a half of southbound tarmac, including a climb out of the hamlet of Oakenclough, turn right onto concessionary bridleway. The views from here are impressive. On a clear day they stretch round from Snowdon to Snaefell. Even if it’s a bit hazy, you’ll see Blackpool Tower wafting a roller-coaster out like a gymnast’s ribbon, and the impressive 126m-tall wind turbine at Dewlay’s cheese factory will be churning out the Garstang Blue. Rattle down through a couple of gates then turn right.

7. Drop down an entertaining track into the shy valley of Calder Vale, then leave on tarmac. Turn left onto Strickens Lane and follow road signs back to Garstang.

8. If you don’t know Garstang, you’ll need to loop clockwise round the one-way system to get back to the FIG.




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Crook of Lune

Crook of Lune, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats:  10 miles

OS Map:

Refreshments

In Lancaster, try the Whale Tail cafe or the Juicafe for a laid-back atmosphere.

Character

Family-friendly pootling along a pleasant, level trail set in magnificent riverside woodland. Do as an out-and-back for maximum flexibility or chain together with the Lune Estuary ride or the Salter Road for a much longer outing.

Start point: Choose from Lancaster city centre, Denny Beck Bridge car park, Caton or Bull Beck car park.


Route

Turn-by-turn description would be obtiose – just follow the obvious trail until you’ve half-had enough. Instead, here’s a nice image …




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Beacon Fell MTB

Beacon Fell, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats: 20 miles

OS Map:

Refreshments

The cafe at Beacon Fell is perfectly situated halfway round.

Character

A varied switchback across the pastures of West Lancashire with a play in the woods to boot. Try to pick a day during a prolonged dry spell or a hard frost, as the section crossing the Brock can get squelchy. This area is richly-populated with ground-nesting birds such as lapwings and curlews so please take care not to disturb them. Perhaps relatedly, it is also rich in stoats. I usually have at least one close encounter with them on this ride.


Route

1. Head out of Garstang down the High Street heading south. Passs Sainsbury’s on your right, go over the bridge then left at the mini-roundabout into Dimples Lane.

2. Cross the humpback over the canal and turn left at the end, over the M6 and right into Sandholme Lane.

3. Turn left at a bridge overhung by trees and climb Butt Hill Lane. Turn right into Gonder Lane and take the next left into Bleasedale Lane.

4. As the climbing eases, turn right into Snape Rake Lane (now the off-road fun begins). Follow this steeply down to a watersplash (you’re going to get wet coming back, so why not?) and a challenging climb out of the Brock valley.

5. Turn left at the end into Oakenclough Lane and, after a short climb, right into North Nook Lane (Brown sign to Beacon Fell).

6. Turn left at the top. You’re now on a tarmac, one-way road that loops around Beacon Fell. There are legitimate trails in the woods on your right, that lead right up to the summit. Have fun.

7. When you’ve been round the trails, admired the views and supped at the cafe, retrace your tyre-tracks back to Snape Rake Lane, past the entrance to Waddecar Scout Camp.[If the ground is really soft, you might be better retracing your route along the whole of Snape rake Lane to point 4)]

8. Just before the track starts descending steeply, turn right onto a rather squidgy bridleway. Zig zag down to the river and splash through it to pick up the steep rake sloping up to the right.

9. At the top, follow the wall north-west (I once had a stoat scream at me, just a couple of feet from my face, from inside this wall) and drop down to a bridge before reaching the road at Tootle Hall.

10. Cross the road with care (awkward bend) and take the permitted bridleway (marked Delph Lane) north-west to Broadgate Farm then zig-zagging up to the left to join Delph Lane.

11. Follow tarmac north (with great views) for a while, dipping to the hamlet of Oakenclough and passing Grizedale Lea Reservoir. At Grizedale Bridge, turn left onto bridleway, though a sheepfold system and rising to the right. Pick up a good track dropping towards Fell End Farm but bypass the farm on the left.

12. After the farm, turn left on a good, gated track and follow this past Grizedale Reservoir and down the valley itself. When you run out of bridleway, turn left on Higher Lane, right into Keeper’s Lane and right again into Delph Lane.

13. After the motorway, go straight on into Forge Lane where the road dinks right at a duck pond. For good measure (and to wash the mud off the bike) splash through the ford and up Wyre Lane, turning left at the end back to Garstang.




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Abbey Village MTB

Abbey Village, Lancashire

Route Information

Stats: 3.5 miles and 350 feet (family ride)

OS Map:

Refreshments

If you’re prone to extreme thirst, there’s the Hare and Hounds pub at the start/finish or The Royal Arms halfway round, slightly off-route.

Character

A pleasant bimble through woods along a chain of three reservoirs. Makes a gentle evening excursion or an outing with youngsters (though you might be better returning through the woods and avoiding the A675 in that case)


Route

1. There’s ample parking at the Hare and Hounds if you’re a patron, or in Dole Lane if you’re not. Set off along the obvious track, skirting the first reservoir.

2. Loop around the back of Rake Cottage, then cross a small wooden bridge.

3. Cross the dam of Lower Roddlesworth Reservoir and then keep skirting the waters, heading
upstream through pleasant woods.

4. At a small bridge, with signage ahead to “Slipper Lowe Car Park”, turn right. The Royal Arms is up above the woods to the left.

5. Follow Roddlesworth Lane down to the A675 and back to the start.




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Todmorden Test Ride

Todmorden Test Ride

Route Information

Stats: 10.5 miles & 1227 ft of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Todmorden has a good choice of eateries, including great veggie options. Bikes shops in the area are renowned for their service, and the place is all around friendly. Nearby Youth Hostels provide cheap accommodation options, and the town has several B&B options as well.

Character

Ride out into the hills from the Cycle Factory, with an epic climb and a cracking descent. Nuff said…


Route

The route will leave Cycle Factory and head east on the A646 for riders to spin their legs and warm up before heading to the hills. The first climb of the day heads out the valley floor on the Strava segment known as the ‘Stoodley Lung Buster’. The aim on the day is to climb this fire style road at a steady pace to the top.

From Harvelin Park the route follows a flat section before climbing up to one of the popular climbs in the area ‘London Road’. This bridleway hugs the hillside and the climb is gradual to Swillington. The wind can feature and be in your face but fingers crossed the weather will be kind. On the final section to the farm gate there is a rock garden that can be ridden or bypassed depending upon one’s mood.

From Swillington the route follows a fast farm style road before heading to high ground on Whitaker Road. This part of the ride forms a loop of Erringden Grange and then retraces the steps back to Harvelin Park. On route the descent of London Road is a feature and rides well the majority of the year.

A short section of the bridleways and Pennine Bridleway around Mankinholes and Lumbutts takes you to the
Top Brink Inn. There is a steep cobbled descent on offer for the braver riders and those that don’t fancy it can loop around through the car park. The route continues on the road climbing up to the Shepherds Rest Inn before heading off road for the final time descending into the heart of Todmorden. A simple roll on the main road back to Cycle Factory and you are done.




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