Sutton Bank and Boltby

Sutton Bank & Boltby

Route Information

Stats:

16 miles and 1687 feet of ascent

OS Map: requires new map

Refreshment

This route starts and finishes at the National Parks Visitor Centre at Sutton Bank. It has good safe car parking, a cafe and toilets. From 2013, it will also have bike hire.

Please do not park along the verges nearby. Pay for parking and keep the lanes clear and verges undamaged.

Character

The route takes you along the escarpment overlooking the Vale of York, before diving down Thirlby Bank at speed. This is a technical line, with twists and turns over rocks. A climb back up via Boltby village will test your fitness, before a rolling passage along the Cleveland Way, before a great descent across a moorland meadow. Climb easily back up through woods and then enjoy the rolling singletrack across the escarpment all the way back to the car. Time now for tea and cake.

Start Point: National Parks Visitor Centre, Sutton Bank


Route

1. From the car park head along the lane towards Cold Kirby for a short distance, alongside the horse gallops. At Dialstone Farm turn left onto the bridleway that skirts the edge of fields before turning  onto the Cleveland Way. Go through the small gate and head along the scar before a bridleway sign to the left, guides you steeply down through trees. This rocky singletrack is technical, with some dips, twists and drops. Towards the bottom, stick to the left, avoiding the uneven horse tracks in the gully.

2. Take the lower BW, which speeds you down through trees (keeping to the upper left edges of the gully), before a fast descent across the meadow to the lane which leads into Boltby village. Turn right at Boltby and climb Boltby Bank nearly to the top, before heading left into the woods and along the bridleway to High Paradise Farm. Avoid the lower road to the farm, as the extra climb to this BW is worth the effort.

3. At High Paradise Farm turn left along the Cleveland Way, passing the first BW to the left (in the woods), rolling along gently to the next bridleway to the left (gate in wall), which twists left before descending the moorland meadow at speed to the BW junction at Gallow Hill. Go through the gate and take the bridleway left, through Boltby Forest and back up to the Cleveland Way. Turn right onto the track and cycle along to Sneck Yate.

4. As you reach the road, descend Boltby Bank for  200 yards before joining the bridleway left onto the Cleveland Way. This climbs across a smooth grassy meadow, before singletrack rolls you along the top of Boltby Scar. The riding now flows, with gentle descents that twist along the singletrack before climbing up and back towards Dialstone Farm.

  1. 5.At Dialstone Farm turn right and head back to the visitor centre and nice cup of tea.



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Rudland Rigg

Rudland Rigg

Route Information

Stats: 18 miles 2035 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

This is a ride into the wild, so take some stuff with you. However, once back at
Kirkbymoorside, there are ample pubs and cafes to choose from, with good clean toilets in the car park as well. We chose the Penny Bank Cafe, which is superb – a great pot of tea and the best bacon butties anywhere.

Character

This route has a lot of everything, including a section of moorland singletrack that is amongst the best in the UK – yep. I know that’s a big statement, but ride it and see. The route itself starts off with some easy riding and some woodland downhilling, followed by a long climb along Rudland Rigg, before turning off on singletrack to Low Row. A meander back along tracks and lanes brings you back into the heart of Kirkbymoorside with wide grins.


Route

1. From the car park in Kirkby Moorside head up the hill to Castlegate before then turning off onto Park Street. This climbs steadily, joining a tarmaced bridleway, which eventually turns off to the left onto a track alongside woodland.

2. After a short distance a track to the right descends at speed through the trees, then levelling out before a further speedy descent takes you down to the river level. A steep and somewhat slippy climb then leads you back uphill, before the woodland is exited, then crossing meadows to the lane which leads to Gillamoor.

3. Ride through Gillamoor on the road towards Hutton le Hole. This initially climbs before heading downhill. As the road bends around, a bridleway is signed to the left which takes you past Faddell Rigg. Follow this, climbing steadily, passing the BW junction and keeping the woodland to your left, heading towards the road between Gillamoor and Rudland Rigg.

4. On exiting the bridleway turn right and pedal uphill towards Rudland Rigg, eventually leaving the tarmac for a good stony moorland track that continues to climb, with expansive views in all directions.

5. Climb steadily on the doubletrack for just under 3 miles, passing a trig point to the left. At a point 1/3 of a mile before a clear track junction there is a indistict track (BW) to the right. This descends on sweet singletrack via West Gill to towards Low Mill. It’s one of the best sections of singletrack you’ll ever find: technical, twisting and downward.

6. At Low Mill take the tarmac road which initially climbs in the direction of Gillamoor. After 1 mile a track (BW) leads off on the left to Cross Farm. Be careful here NOT to take the obvious descending track, but stick to the right hand side of the small farmhouse and follow the flowing track across rough meadowland, which eventually becomes a rocky double track, spitting you out at speed onto the Gillamoor Road once more. Head into Gillamoor.

7. At Gillamoor take the road through the village towards Kirkby Moorside. As this bends sharply right (end of the village) a road leads off straight ahead (Woodhead Field Lane) – take this. This eventually becomes a bridleway that rolls you through trees right into Kirkby Moorside and the finish.




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Rosedale Ramble

Rosedale Abbey MTB

Route Information

Stats: 21.4 miles with 1943 ft of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Rosedale Abbey has a good pub (The Coach House Inn) and a great coffee shop and tea room, the ‘Graze On The Green.’ Ample pubs abound in the surrounding area, and the famous ‘Lion Inn’ at Blakey Crossing is on route. When I did the route, a RAF Search & Rescue helicopter had stopped off for lunch!

Character

A superb introduction to Rosedale’s famous singletrack. I saw this route on the Muddy Bums website and had to ride it, so thanks guys. I’ve altered it only slightly, to bring in some more technical singletrack. It starts with a tarmac climb, before a gentle ride along the ironstone railway that soon turns into a technical singletrack, with rock gardens, twists and drops. Crossing the moor again, the technical nature continues, requiring skill in balance, line and pedal power. A fast, swooping ride across Danby Moor Estate leads to more tarmac, before a final singletrack descent back to Rosedale.

The technical nature of parts of this route makes it a hard ride, so don’t underestimate it.

Start Point: Car Park at Rosedale Abbey village


Route

1. From the car park in Rosedale Abbey village, turn right and right again at the next junction, signed ‘Castleton’. This road turns to the right on leaving the village, and climbs steadily, passing ‘Bell End’ – yes, I did say that – before taking the road to the left (signed as a Cul-de-Sac) at Low Bell End. Now there’s a medical condition if ever I heard one! The road now descends to Hill Cottages, before climbing again.

2. Passing the lines of terraced cottages, and immediately after the red telephone box to your right, take the bridleway to the right, which climbs to a series of farm buildings. Now go around the rear of the buildings and leave the bridleway, instead taking the Ironstone Railway. This smooth grassy track passes underneath historic mine workings before the smooth doubletrack gives way to twisting and rocky singletrack, that will test your handling skills.

3. As the railway meets a BW crossing it, stay on the railway, avoiding these BWs, twisting around the scar on superb singletrack all the way to the Lion Inn at Blakey. Take a break here if you like. When I rode this route, a Search & Rescue helicopter had popped in for lunch! At the road, turn right and head along for a quarter of a mile before joining the singletrack bridleway to the right cutting across the moor at Rosedale Head.

4. At the next road turn right and head along to the road junction signed ‘Fryup’, taking this narrow road to the left for a short distance, before a bridleway to the right at Trough House (Cut Road) speeds you down and across Glaisdale Moor.

5. As the path meets the road, turn right and cycle along, passing a minor road to your left and turning right at the next junction signed ‘Rosedale 3m’. Take the next bridleway to the right (by a green metal gate), crossing the moor and rolling down, before joining a shooting track which speeds you down to the road at Heygate Bank.

6. At the road, go straight across onto a short single track leading to Hancow Road. Turn right on the road for 700mts to corner of forest. Turn left here at gate sign posted bridleway. The double track gradually becomes a fast single tack to the gate at the bottom of Hartoft Rigg. Turn right on the lane for 800mts to Rock House. Turn right just before the building onto track into woods. A tough climb of 60 metres leads back up to the Hancow Road.

7. Cross the road diagonally to the right picking up a track leading into the woods marked with a black arrow. After 600 metres the track comes out into the open. Turn left after 70mts on marked bridleway down field and then right at the fence. Follow this to the top of Gates Plantation for a fast descent through the woods to gate at bottom. Go straight ahead at gate across field to road. Turn right on road to Rosedale Abbey.




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Rievaulx Woods

Rievaulx Woods

Route Information

Stats: 10.2 miles and 1408 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

The cafe at the Rievaulx Abbey entrance is superb. It also has toilets. Nearby Scawton has a good pub, The Hare Inn. There’s a great choice of accommodation in the area, particularly in nearby Helmsley, where they also have a Youth Hostel.

Character

Numerous bridleways and tracks cut across this valley. The route here is a good introduction, and a great little evening or afternoon ride. A few steep climbs and a terrific short singletrack descent, good woodland trails, and great little swooping descent across open meadows. Oh, and the views are spectacular. Save it as a last ride of the weekend before heading home. You’ll definitely want to return.

Start Point: Choose either the English Heritage car park, or a small car park behind the Methodist Chapel in the village


Route

1. From the Methodist Chapel take the track (Arden Lane) which initially rises, before a forked junction of tracks, taking the left hand track which descends to Bow Bridge.

2. Cross over the bridge and take the steep track which rises alongside Lambert Hag Wood. At the next junction keep right and head towards Tylas Farm. This track rolls gently before a steep descent, followed by a climb to a junction of BWs just before the farm. Take the bridleway through the gate straight ahead and climb up to Birk Bank woods.

3. The woodland track rises and falls, before crossing a meadow and leading out onto a lane near Caydale Mill. Turn left and climb steeply, turning right at the top along High Leir Lane.

4. After approx a mile, take the bridleway to the right, which skirts around the field before dropping steeply on singletrack over rocks. Cross the wooden bridge at the valley bottom and climb up to Murton Grange, ignoring the BW passed by to the right. At the road junction, turn right and head along a short distance before exiting to the right into Cliff Wood.

5. An excellent forest track rolls along, before reaching a gated meadow. Cross the meadow until a junction of BWs by a derelict barn to your right. Take the right hand BW across the meadow, which eventually descends at speed back to Tylas Farm. Follow the route back to Rievaulx and a drink.



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Rag Robin Ramble

Rag Robin Ramble

Route Information

Stats: 8.9 miles Ascent: 1486 ft (without extension)

OS Map: 

Refreshments

Kepwick often has teas and cakes on offer in the summer. However, the best option is nearby Osmotherley. Fantastic tea rooms, a chip shop and two pubs. I can recommend the Queen Catherine for food and atmosphere. It also has a Youth Hostel and a wealth of B & B opportunities.

Thirsk and Northallerton are not too far away, and have even more places to stay.

Character

You’ve guessed it, this route starts with a climb. However, the country landowner has made it easy for you, by tarmacking the narrow lane which winds its way up to the junction with the Cleveland Way.

From there it’s a whizz downhill on an excellent track, a woodland ramble and climb, before returning to the moorland.

The route returns to the junction of the Cleveland Way, where you can either retreat at speed down the lane, or take a right and head down and around through Silton Woods, or take a left and go down and around through Boltby Forest – we’ll leave it to you. We’ve kept it as a dash around route, returning to Kepwick down the lane.


Route

1. Park up in the small car park to the front of the village hall. Head down the village, passing the hall to your right, and continue on the lane that is signed “unsuitable for motors.”

2. A wall of tarmac now meets you, so you will need to be fit in order to tackle this. It is an extremely steep climb – beware. However, if you’re up for it, then the surface is good and the views are great. The lane eventually takes you through a gate with a very expensive stone carved sign asking you to close the gate – oh the landed set – before continuing with slight respite before joining the Cleveland Way on the edge of the Hambleton Hills.

3. At this junction take the track ahead, which initially looks slightly n/e of you, but twists around and takes you across excellent smooth moorland tracks, allowing you to open up and enjoy some speed.

4. Through a gate and with woodland to the left and an excellent view of Hawnby ahead, the track falls steeply, becoming rockier.

5. At Arden Hall, go around the cottages to the left, following the bridleway as it climbs through the wood. This climbs steeply in places, with short sections of respite, before finally going through a gate as you leave the woodland for the moor.

6. At this point the bridleway points left. However, a steep path to the right with an isolated tree on it is the route to take. This may be a ‘get off and walk’ section, but it soon leads up onto the moor top and excellent tracks.

7. As this track joins the well-made moorland double track, keep left (almost straight on), and heading back towards the Hambleton ridge. This route dips and turns before bringing you back onto the Drovers way track. Turn left.

8. A short ride will bring you back to the gate leading down the Rag Robin Road. Descend at speed, or alternatively continue along and descend through Boltby Forest and take the lanes back to the car park.




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Osmotherley Introduction

Osmotherley Introduction

Route Information

Stats: 15.4 miles and 1858 feet of ascent

OS Map Link:

Refreshments

Osmotherley is one of the most picturesque and yet easily accessible villages within the Moors National Park. Two good pubs, a great chip shop, and a fantastic tea room to boot. It also has some of the cleanest public toilets in the country – officially! Ample accommodation in the area, including a great campsite nearby.

Character

This is a fantastic introduction to Moors riding. Don’t look at the middle section as 5 miles of toil – it’s 2 1/2 miles of toil, followed by a great downhill section. From Square Corner – yep, check the map name – I’ve taken this route down the Cleveland Way and past the reservoir. However, this is a footpath, so we can’t condone riding this. Either GOAW or take it steady and walk if there are hikers around. It is however too good a descent to avoid totally, if the opportunity exists.

Woodland, hard climbing, fast dusty descents and technical moorland singletrack, this is a great introduction to the area.


Route

1. Start at Osmotherley village and head up North End towards the Moors and Cote Ghyll.

2. Passing the national speed limit signs, a track to the left shows signs for ‘Swainstye Farm’ – take this and follow the bridleway as it climbs up towards Skarth Wood. Gates lead through to a terrific track that descends through a heather clad scene, towards ‘Skarth Nick’ . This really is a superb descent.

3. Crossing the road, turn left over the cattle grid and almost immediately take the BW (Cleveland Way) into the woods on the right and pedal on fine woodland trails, continuing on the Cleveland Way signs as it descends to your left (track junction.)

4. Descend and cross over the woodland track, keeping to the Cleveland Way and climb to Harfa Bank Farm, passing Harfa Bank Farm and continuing along the track in the image to the right. Another red coloured metal gate leads onto a metalled road – turn right) and head along the Scugdale valley, with Barker’s Crag above you to the right. This gate may be locked and require a clamber over.

5. At Scugdale Hall go through the gate, and take the track for cyclists signed to the left. This climbs on tricky ground up onto the Moors proper. A gate finally leads through onto Moorland. Rest here before a short track joins the main Moorland track, turning right and following the bridleway along Barker’s Ridge.

6. Keep to this bridleway, descending Arnsgill Ridge to Rye farm and tarmac. At Low Cote Farm go ahead and down the hill towards Hawnby for about 1/4 mile, before taking the bridleway through the gat to the right. This bridleway climbs on grassy tracks, before traversing a rocky moorland singletrack that will require good line choice and balance.

7. Rejoin the road and turn left towards ‘Square Corner’ and the chance to rest and take in the myriad of tracks that abound this area.

8. At Square Corner follow the road back towards Osmotherley until a BW leads off straight ahead at a corner and bend to the left. This rough track can be technical and descends rocky ground to the Sheepwash.

9. On descending the steep and rocky track down to the Sheepwash take care. It is extremely technical. Ride through the ford and turn left onto the tarmac road and head back to Osmotherley.




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Levisham and Dalby

Levisham & Dalby

Route Information

Stats: 21 miles with 1738 ft of ascent – or more if you fancy it at Dalby Forest!

OS Map:

Refreshments

The Horseshoe Inn at Levisham is a great little spot, although it does have certain closed hours during the winter. However, Dalby Forest has a great visitor centre, and nearby Pickering has a wealth of facilities.

Character

The route starts with a cheeky little climb up onto the moor, followed by some rolling moorland that cuts around the edge of the Hole of Horcum before descending to the road. A BW ride into the forest leads you to red route wonderland and the great tracks of Dalby Forest. A final climb leads out of the forest and back to Levisham on a quiet – but steep – lane.

Start Point: Levisham Village, North Yorks Moors


Route

1. Leave Levisham by the BW to the right hand side of the Horseshoe Inn. This climbs up to the moor before meeting a myriad of tracks and a junction of bridleways – stay north and descend down to the rocky ford, which then climbs up to the track that skirts the Hole of Horcum.

2. This BW eventually descends down to the road (A169). However, stay on the BW as it skips alongside the road to the viewpoint and car park above this geological masterpiece. Cross the road and take the bridleway (double track) which cuts off the road and straight into the forest, initially on tarmac. This continues past Newgate Foot, eventually joining the red route in Dalby proper.

3. Continue along the red route and this double track until a sign for gate 21 on the red route leads off on singletrack to your right. Now grit your teeth, grab the bars and enjoy, following the red route as it twists and swings through trees, descending and climbing, curling around corners on beautiful berms. You can then exit the signed route at gate 37, descending at speed on the forest double track and turning right at the bottom and following this to the visitor centre at Low Dalby and a brew.

4. Once refreshed take the tarmac forest road north, passing the rope activities before joining the bridleway – Overscar Lane – off to the left near to High Dalby House. This climbs steeply back up to the A169. Turn right and cycle along for a third of a mile before turning off left and heading back to Levisham via Lockton – and a very steep climb! If you’re lucky the pub will still be open.




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Helmsley Loop

Helmsley Loop

Route Information

Stats: 19.9 miles (without Hawnby / Murton Grange alternative start) 2858 feet of ascent

OS Map: 

Refreshments

Ample in Helmsley, the home of ‘Thomas The Baker’ and numerous tea shops and pubs. If starting from Hawnby then the Hawnby Tea Rooms are superb, as is the pub in the village, where you can also stay over in some luxury whilst using it as a base for some great riding days.

Character

Starting with a pleasant gravel track through a wooded dale, the route takes you out into a little frequented part of the moors, before bringing you back to Helmsley via the ruins of Rievaulx Abbey. The route is suitable for riders wanting a reasonably long ride, without the hard technical sections of some of the moorland routes.

Most of the route is off road, on well surfaced gravel tracks, although the middle has a section which can be very muddy.

This is a Dylan Hayes route, from one of his cycle websites (www.mtb-routes.co.uk) and is an absolute belter that I’ve wanted to ride for some time. As I live nearer to Hawnby, that’s where I started from, parking just off the road near Murton Grange before heading off into some great woodland tracks that lead to the main route.


Route

1. Park in Helmsley. There is pay and display carpark near the centre of the town. Take the A 170 east towards Kirbymoorside. There is a cyclepath alongside the road for the first 1/2 mile. 1 and 1/4 miles from the market place, you will see a metal waymark on the left. Turn onto the BW and head north across a field. You will shortly join a gravel track through the woods. Follow the track which run parallel to the river, making sure you stay on the most obvious track, and ignore any side tracks.

2. Cross the road at SE 610 894, and pickup the continuation of the BW on the other side of the route, slightly to the left of where you met the road. Stay on the obvious track, crossing a minor tarmac road at SE 590 907. After climbing steadily, the track starts to descend. Just before you reach the B 1257, look for a BW sign on the left at SE 567 896. Turn onto the BW, and climb the very steep track. You’ll probably end up walking at some point as you climb the brutally steep slope.

3. At the top of the hill, the BW flattens out as it heads south west. Carry on along the BW until you reach the carpark at Newgate Bank (there are toilets here). At the main road turn left towards Helmsley. After 1/4 of a mile, look for an entrance to a BW on the right. Turn onto the BW and follow it down into the woods. You can get some speed up on the smooth grassy surface. Take care not to overshoot the sudden left turn, where the BW turns south. 10 yards after the turn, look for a turn to the right, heading onto a narrow path down into the woods. Follow this round a right hand bend until you arrive at the farm track, near the farm buildings. Turn left onto the track, and follow it until you see a BW gate on the right. Follow the narrow BW until you reach a road. Turn right onto the road and cross the bridge (at the time of writing the bridge was still being rebuilt following the floods of 2005).

4. Shortly after the bridge there is a turn to the left onto a bridleway which follows a farm track. Climb up the track, before turning off to follow the BW around the farm. Keep on the BW which rejoins a rough track. Eventually, after quite a lot of climbing, you’ll arrive at SE 559 875, near a ruined farm building.

5. Turn left and follow a BW down through the fields towards Tylas Farm. If conditions are muddy, stay on the BW past Tylas farm and follow the BW to SE 565 856. Pass the farm, and look for a stoney track climbing the hill to the right. Climb the track to Tylas Barn, and continue along the muddy farm track until you reach the road near Old Byland. Turn right on to the road and head towards Old Byland.

6. Pass through the pretty village, just after the road bears right, look for a BW waymark on the right. Go through the gate, and head down the steep grassy bank until you reach the edge of the woods. Turn left and head along the narrow and tricky track. This can be hard to ride when wet, as the surface is very slippery. The track then heads to the valley floor. There are a few hundred yards which can be very boggy all year, but conditions will improve soon. Carry on over the fields, until you reach a farm track. Again, this can be muddy when wet. Follow the track until you reach a concrete surfaced track. Turn left onto this track, and follow the track up the hill until you reach the road. Turn left onto the road and climb for 200 yard until you reach a farm track on the right. Take the track and descent for 200 yards until you reach a turn on the right. If you have taken the ‘wet weather’ option at Tylas Farm, you rejoin the route here.

7. Turn right (or left if you have come from Tylas Farm) and head down the stoney track, crossing a stone bridge. You will then start to climb, before descending again to the village of Rievaulx. Turn right and pass the impressive ruins of the abbey. Follow the road next to the river until you come to a ‘T’ junction. Turn left and head along the valley floor, until the road climbs up a steep hill. At the crossroads with the B 1257 turn right and head down the long hill to Helmsley and the start.

Alternative Start

Murton Grange start (adding 1.5 miles each way)

If you’d rather have Helmsley as a halfway halt, then the route can also be started from Murton Grange near Hawnby. This way it gives masses of options at halfway for food etc, and also leaves you nice and muddy for a pint in a country pub at Hawnby when you finish, or tea and cakes at the Hawnby Tea House.

Either way, these options can also fill your appetite at a halfway halt if starting from Helmsley. It’s just a nearer start for me to ride from Hawnby, and it adds some good woodland to the route.

1. Park at Murton Grange beside trees and off the road. Take the Hawnby road for approx 1/4 mile before heading off into the woods to the right on the bridleway.

2. Continue along this track as it gently winds it way along and down to the track junction at Hagg Wood where you join the main route: point 5 above.

3. Once around the loop and back at the BW junction, reverse back to Murton Grange and Hawnby.




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Hambleton Hills MTB

Hambleton Hills MTB

Route Information

Stats: 32 miles and 4034 feet of ascent – this is a biggy of a route

OS Map:

Refreshments

This is Osmotherley – it has everything. Two good pubs, tea shops and cafes with great cake, the cleanest public loos anywhere – officially – and ample parking. Along the way you’ll need to carry plenty of fluids and food, as tea stops are not found without detours. You can however detour down to Swainby, or down to Hawnby – both adding distance.

Character

Parking in Osmotherley village, you are immediately met by what this route is all about – climbing. The route starts with a climb, and finally rolls you down through trees before tarmac leads you back. Along the way you climb and descend on rocky technical tracks, wide fast double tracks and even get in some secret singletrack near Hanwby Moor.


Route

1. From the village, head out towards Hawnby on the road which climbs steeply, twisting its way up to the moor. As the road turns right near Chequers, take the bridleway to the left, which falls across rough and rocky ground down to the Sheepwash – see the picture to the right of the descent!

2. At the road turn right and head along to the cattle grid near trees to the right (Scarth Nick), where a red coloured steel gate leads into trees at the Cleveland Way BW. Follow this BW until it exits onto a narrow lane at Hollin Hill, heading down on tarmac to Huthwaite Green and then onto Scudgale.

3. At Scugdale take the bridleway which climbs steeply (possible bike hike) through Barkers Crag and onto Bilsdale West Moor. This rolls you down to the road at Carlton Bank, where you need to cross over the road and head along the bridleway opposite for a short but worthy detour around the small woodland, then exiting onto the road towards Chop Gate.

4. A further 1.3 miles along the road towards Chop Gate, a track to the right leads to a bridleway, climbing up again to moorland near to Scugdale. Do not return to Scugdale but do take the track as it turns down to Snilesworth Moor and Arnsgill Ridge. This speeds you down to a small hamlet at Low Cote Farm.

5. Take the road down to Locker Low Wood, then the bridleway which climbs across a meadow, before closing down into some secret singletack that finally spits you out near Square Corner.

6. Climb the bridleway onto the Hambleton ridge on steep and rocky ground, eventually eveing out and rolling past the top of the Rag Robin Road. A third of a mile (1/3) past the Rag Robin Road, a gate in the wall to the right leads to a bridleway which is ridden at speed, turning and twisting its way down to the road at Brickshed Cott.

7. Follow the road through Cowesby, turning left, then right then left again before taking the bridleway which cuts the corner at Mill Hill. Do not take the first BW here, which is poor and not worthy of the trip.

8. Follow the road as it climbs to Over Silton, then taking the woodland BW as it climbs then falls steeps down to Thimbleby. At the road head back to Osmotherley for a well earnt rest. My personal recommendation is the Queen Catherine PH…




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Great Hograh Moor and Baysdale

Great Hograh Moor

Route Information

Stats: 14 miles 2133 feet of ascent (medium route)

OS Map:

Refreshments

The ride starts and finishes at Ingleby Greenhow where you should be able to park up. We parked near the Dudley Arms PH, a great little country pub.

There’s also a fantastic butchers shop in the village, selling pies and flapjacks for you to stock up on in advance. Nearby Great Ayton has a good selection of cafes.

Character

If you like singletrack with some climbing and descending thrown in then this is the route for you. At only 14 miles it really packs a punch, starting off with a steep climb of Ingleby Bank over rough and technical terrain. Then the singletrack begins, giving you a taster of what’s on offer further along at Great Hograh Moor. A rolling ride back to Baysdale Abbey, before climbing moorland tracks again, then a superb descent of Ingleby Bank to finish, testing your line choice and handling skills.


Route

1. Starting from The Dudley Arms at Ingleby Greenhow, climb the lane (Stone Stoup Hill) that turns left and heads towards Kildale. As you leave the village a narrow junction (signed cul de sac) to the right – take this towards the moors.

2. Continue up, passing Bank Foot Farm and ignoring the BW to the right. Go through the metal gate into the trees and climb steeply on good forest tracks. It’s the middle track of the three that you need to take – heading up!

3. Reaching the end of the trees a large gate takes you onto the steep and rough climb of Ingleby Bank. No shame in walking sections of this; it is extremely rough and technical – great for coming down, but hard going up.

4. As you reach the top of the climb a BW junction is signed to your left by two metal posts with a chain between them. Ensure that it is the BW directly to the other side of the chain that you take. Here the singletrack begins, leading on from a short doubletrack introduction section. The singletrack spits you out on a good moorland hard packed shooting track with a doubletrack leading off opposite. Turn left on the shooting track and follow this all the way to the tarmc at Battersby Bank.

5. At Battersby Bank descend the steep tarmac to Baysdale Abbey, seen sitting in the picturesque valley below. As you descend this road, ignore the BW signs off to the left and continue down to the Abbey itself. Once at the Abbey a BW takes you to the left, passing agricultural buildings, though a gate and onto a good double track to the side of sheep meadows. Follow this track until it turns uphill at a wall towards Thorntree House (farm).

6. At Thorntree House follow the doubletrack as it climbs steeply through the small woodland to a large gate at the moor edge. The shooting track is seen to continue easliy ahead; however, we need to take the indistict track (BW) to the left that runs alongside the trees. Initially rough doubletrack, this soon merges into good singletrack that twists you around and across to join the shooting track further along.

7. Exiting onto the shooting track, turn left and descend the track at speed to the BW junction in the valley bottom near to the ford. Ignore the ford and the initial narrow track that you will see leading off to the right. Taking this will mean a bike hike or accidents. Instead, ride along a further 100 yards before taking the track down to your right, crossing the footbridge across the beck (stream) onto Great Hograh Moor.

8. The rough and rocky singletrack now climbs with a degree of technical difficulty onto easier singletrack above. Once past the difficulties enjoy the sweet singletrack across the moor as it rolls you along towards Westerdale.

9. Dropping down from the moor onto a narrow tarmac lane, turn left and descend to the ford at Hob Hole. A steep tarmac climb waits, testing your stamina before a welcome exit left onto the BW above Baysdale Beck. Follow this excellent track which varies between double and singletrack, rolling along and passing BW junctions to the right, before turning you through a narrow gate in the drystone wall and descending the rough meadow back down to Baysdale Abbey.

10. Once back at the Abbey a BW is signed in a meadow to the left of the road you descended earlier. This crosses the meadow before entering the trees and climbing towards the moorland. Exit the trees at the gate leading onto the moor and climb the shooting track onto Ingleby Moor. As the climbing eases a junction of tracks is reached on the left. Take this (BW) which turns you back NW towards Ingleby Bank. This excellent track eventually rejoins the shooting track you rode earlier. Cross straight over onto the singletrack and ride back to Ingleby Bank and the chained fence.

11. Once at Ingleby Bank lower your saddle, hold on tight and choose the right line as you descend rock steps and water ruts and follow the map back to Ingleby Greenhow and a well earnt rest.




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