Ingleborough

Ingleborough

Route Information

Stats: 6 miles, 1750 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments:

None on the hill but Bernie’s is well worth a stop.

Character

Unclassifiable because it’s a very short route, half of which is very easy and half of which is a wild testing ground. I can categorically state that the last few steppy sections to the summit are totally unrideable to mortals. I don’t care if you post a link to a YouTube clip of you and your mates rattling down it; anything can be faked with CGI these days. Just look at those moon landings… Even as a dead weight, it’s worth lugging the bike up to the top for the triumphant pictures by the cruciform shelter.

There is limited parking on the Blea Moor road as you leave Ingleton.


Route

Unnecessary really, because the route is never in doubt. Start up the steep farm track, follow the drove road to the right fork just before Crina Bottom, and keep pedaling as long as legs and lungs allow.




This is a straight up Ingleborough route, so a gpx file is unnecessary

Ingleborough Round

Ingleborough Round

Route Information

Stats: 26.6 miles

OS map:

Refreshments

Both Ingleton and Clapham have excellent facilities. For me, Ingleton scrapes it for the cafes, with a wide variety. The cafe above Inglesport is excellent, and ‘Bernies’ on the High Street has good portions that’ll fill you up, whilst being a bit more welcoming to muddied up mountain bikers. We’ve started this route at Ingleton, where there is an excellent Youth Hostel, and a good selection of bed and breakfast accommodation.

Character

This is a hard route, with some steep climbing and good rolling descents. Although not our hardest route, it covers some rough ground and takes you into the real Dales, as you circumnavigate Ingleborough, so make sure that your map reading skills are up to speed. It can get warm out in the hills in the summer months, so take plenty of water on this route. There are few places to stop and refresh. The best option is the Three Peaks Cafe at Horton in Ribblesdale. Like all good rides, it finishes on a downhill.


Route

1. Turn left out of the car park and follow the minor road signed for Clapham. This is a 5km stretch of tarmac to warm up along.

2. At Clapham turn left into Eggshell Lane and then into Church Lane, crossing the bridge. At the end of the churchyard turn left, heading for the tunnels and Austwick (signed), before turning left at a junction onto Long Lane (bridleway).

3. (Grid SD750694) Follow Long Lane to a gate onto Moorland, bearing slightly right and following the grassy track. Go through another gate and keep right to keep the high point to your left. Continue to a concrete plinth, turning left and then right and onto another plinth. The bridleway is well signed all the way past Long Scar and across limestone countryside to a track ‘X’ roads at Sulber, where you continue along the bridleway north, ahead towards Borrins where it twists right and down to the tarmac lane.

4. Once on tarmac, head south along the lane and into Horton in Ribblesdale, continuing through the village, over the bridge to the Crown Inn.

Now is the chance for a brew at the nearby Three Peaks Cafe, or continue by turning left and alongside the Crown to the bridleway signed ‘Pennine Way’ and ‘Ribble Way’ which eventually lead you past Sell Gill Holes.

5. After 6km of this bridleway a junction of bridleways is reached. Take the left hand fork, down to Ing Gill. This track is signed as part of the Pennine Way, so continue on this until you reach Ling Gill Bridge. Go over the bridge and turn right on the track, continuing on it until the junction with the Dales Way. Turn left and head towards Ribblehead.

6. At the Ribblehead road junction a van is usually parked up which serves teas etc. Make use of this before the next short but steep climb, from the road, follow the track (signed bridleway) which leads off towards the viaduct, going below the arches to Gunnerfleet Farm. Go around buildings to a ‘T’ junction, turning right and on to another junction (bridleway), turning left (Scar End), keeping on the track until it breaks right

Go through a gate on the left, through fields to a waymark that directs you right. This track will lead you all the way to Ellerbeck Gill.

7. A vague and boggy track in the wet now leads for some 3 km, all the way to limestone pavement above Twistleton Scar. When you reach the notch in the Scar (edge) enjoy a twisting descent all the way to Scar End and tarmac.

8. Now follow the roads all the way back to Ingleton and beans on toast at Bernies.

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Hutton Roof

Hutton Roof MTB

Route Information

Stats: 8.5 miles and 1100 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Not many opportunities, though there’s the Plough at Lupton.

Character

Although this ride makes an evening spin or a consolation prize if central Lakeland is washed out, it is also a charming outing in its own right. This corner of Cumbria is massively overlooked in favour of the famous haunts but proves to be pleasant, rolling limestone country.

If you want to get the road section out of the way first (and save the highlight descent to the end) then start as close as you can to Holme Park Farm at 530474.


Route

1. Mosey north on the A6070 under the imposing pudding-basin of Farleton Knott. Don’t worry too much about the urgent thrum from the motorway as you’ll be parting from it soon.

2. Take a right at Duke’s Bridge through Farleton. Ignore two lefts tempting you across the canal and also ignore a right fork into Puddlemire Lane then dink over Farleton Beck at Nook Bridge and fork left to join the A65 at Summerdale Nursery (MS on 1:25000 map).

3. Turn right on the A65 then soon left at the “VR” postbox. The road climbs slightly, past a house renovation project on the right. At the power lines, take the bridleway on the right.

4. Keep climbing, ignoring turns on the right and another bridleway joining from the left. Stick to broadly the same line, past a big ash tree (assuming it survives die-back) heading above a phone mast via a diagonal, gorsey wall with a small wind turbine on the left.

5. Now go through the roaming pygmy goats and pecking chickens of Lupton High, contouring to a huge meadow crank-deep with grasses in summer. (Parents will find themselves reciting the appropriate passage from We’re Going On A Bear Hunt at this point) Swish through this on a diagonal line, becoming defined at a gate with a tree stump at the bottom.

6. Enter a sunken lane with some stony sections and pass some horse paddocks to re-emerge on the road at the 107m spot height.

7. Go left on the A65 until you reach Thompson Fold and a bridleway on your right (when this ride was researched, this section was out-of-bounds due to some barn conversion work but there were bridleway signs at both ends so it should be navigable)

8. Emerge at Badger Gate with its tiny duck pond and boat house then turn right on to bridleway signed to Newbiggin. This is a narrow lane flanked by deep hedges and richly carpeted with buttercups, campion and nettles. This makes it a memorable section, especially if clad in shorts. Maybe it needs someone with chariot scythes on their wheels to strim it down a bit. At one point, you go over a funny undercroft (perhaps a sheep shelter?) underneath a gate.

9. At the road, turn left then immediately right toTown End Farm.

10. After the house called Barrowdale, take the next left. If the bridleway sign is lost in elderflower, look out for the blue tape on the gate sign. After a lovely, slanting climb, ignore a right turn and drop slightly through Whin Yeats farmyard. Leave on the concrete farm road, turning right at the public road.

11. Turn right again at the Limestone Link sign. There are many forks, but aim just to the right of a limestone tor. Two gates appear ahead and the track becomes much better defined. Then finish with a flourish on a cracking descent furnished with rattlesome rocks to Holme Park Farm.


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Howgills MTB

Howgills MTB

Route Information

Stats: Stats 14 miles, 4680 feet of ascent

OS Map: 

Refreshments

Car parking is available at Joss lane or Loftus Hill near the town centre. In the evenings you should be able to locate ample off-road parking. Ample tea rooms abound along the Main Street, and the local hostelries can be recommended. For those of you who have ventured out of Lakeland for the first time, Sedbergh is a delight and will surely draw you back again. The Howgills have some great accommodation alternatives, be it camping or bed and breakfast. Check it out at http://hiddenhowgills.co.uk/accom/self-catering.html

Character

I’d long since had a soft spot for the Howgills, but a chance mishearing suddenly endeared them to me even more. My daughter, then very young, pointed at the rolling swell on the horizon and asked, “Are those the Cowgirls, Dad?” From the mouths of babes comes praise indeed. The new name perfectly encapsulated their combination of undulating femininity and enticing wildness. So, in our family, they will forever be the Cowgirls. These hills provide an unparalleled riding experience – smooth surfaces, stunning views and a wealth of bridleways, with four distinct and legal ways to the tops. But, and this is a huge “but”, you will need lungs and you will need legs – three of each should about do it. Because the climbs are colossal.


Route

1. Leave the town on the road signposted to Howgill, past the People’s Hall, rising on tarmac until a concrete lane signposted “Permissive Path to the Fell” heads up to the right. Follow this to a farmyard and go up through a couple of gates.

2. At the intake, head up to the left until you reach a dry stream bed. Newton’s Fourth Law of Motion states that what goes zig must eventually go zag. Haul up alongside the stream bed until you find the shelving track skirting rightwards through the bracken. Follow this doggedly, rising in an anti-clockwise spiral round the shoulder of Winder. Keep going up the ridge then take the right fork up the flank of Arant Haw. As you climb, memorise all the little steps you’ll be catching air on when you come back down.

But, for now, there’s just a short, rattly descent to a col before the pull onto Brant Fell, starting steep and getting progressively steeper and looser. Newton’s fourth applies again – zag to the right. The Calf is now just a couple of swoops away on a gravelly track.

3. Take a moment to admire the views from this vantage point between Lakes and Dales. Then strap yourself in for the plummet down the flank of White Fell (parachute optional). The descent starts blithely enough – skirting north-west, then south-west, round the declivity of Calf Beck. Then the ridge just falls away and a little thing called gravity get its mitts on you. Fortunately, the surface is smooth and the way is straight, so a point-and-hope approach may just be see you down.

4. Splash through Long Rigg Beck and keep going on a slightly climbing track that drops down to the road. Turn left and follow tarmac down into Chapel Gill and out again. Turn left on a farm track to Birkhaw and keep going, with another splash through Bram Rigg Beck.

5. Your mission now, whether you choose to accept it or not, is to ride as far as you can up Bram Rigg itself, clawing for every litre of Cumbrian air you can lay your lungs on. The last stretch dinks left to the main ridge and you’re back on known territory.

(5a. For a longer version – ride back up the Calf trig point and sample the bucking descent north-east, followed by the long descent of Bowderdale. Then haul yourself back up to the Calf for the Grand Finale. That is, if you’re up to three big climbs.)

6. The way south from the top of the Howgills has to be the most fun descent anywhere. Apart from a slight pull onto Arant Haw, the only way is down, down and down. Trust me – this is as much fun as you will ever have with your Lycra on. Because Cowgirls know how to show you a good time, right?




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Heart of the Dales MTB

Heart of the Dales

Route Information

Stats: 36.3 miles and 2988 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Horton is the start of the famous ‘Three Peaks’ walk, so there are ample facilities. Public toilets are at the side of the car park. A couple of good cafes are within hobbling distance, and the Crown Inn offers good B&B, as do numerous other places in the vicinity. Nearby is the town of Settle, with even more extensive facilities. Bainbridge offers refuelling opportunities at the Rose and Crown.

Character

This is a fantastically varied ride through the heart of the Dales. It packs in five serious climbs and enough teeth-rattling descents to leave the keenest rider satisfied. It has every surface on the menu – solid stone, rubble, chippings, grass, water splashes, fire road and even a few stretches of tarmac. The route here will test your stamina, your map reading, and your bike! The climbs are hard, but the descents are superb, with views to last a lifetime.


Route

1. From Horton, slip round the back of The Crown, on the right, where the road dinks left. The byway is signposted to Birkwith Moor. Climb steadily on a stony drove road, ignoring any left forks.

Enter coniferous forest and follow a good track through the trees until the landscape starts opening out again around High Green Field. Keep avoiding left turns. The road becomes tarmac and falls gently into Langstrothdale at Beckermonds.

2. Hang a left here at 319m and dig in for the road climb up Oughtershaw Side to 589m, the highest road in the Dales. It’ll test your legs and your mind, as you enter the realms of Dales mountain biking.

On a clear day, the views are stunning, including south west to the sea at Heysham and east as far as Carlton Bank – almost coast to coast. Wild Boar Fell looks pretty tasty, too.

3. Follow the road down through a L-R zigzag but, where it plummets diagonally left to Hawes, fork right onto the Roman Road (Cam Road). Soon, Semer Water appears on the right. You probably already know it’s one of only three natural lakes in Yorkshire; the other two being Malham Tarn and Gormire Lake. But you probably didn’t know that Semer Water is a rare sheet of inland salt water. Hydrologists have attributed this to the tears of joy from mountain bikers as the descent becomes apparent.

4. It’s almost as if the Romans had set out to create the perfect MTB trail, leading arrow-straight towards the delights of Bainbridge. Be ready to give way to the Burtersett-Countersett road but, otherwise, it’s a fast, direct run. Get some nourishment in Bainbridge because you’ve still got three climbs to look forward to.

5. Leave the village green on the Leyburn Road. then swing right onto the Stalling Busk road after the bridge. Climb on tarmac to a radio mast and turn left here, signposted to Carpley Green. Semer Water looks good, nestling in Raydale to your right while the romantic, Arthurian fortress of Addlebrough rises impressively on the left.

6. Pass through the farm then trundle south to Stake Allotments but don’t expect cloth-capped gaffers bent over leeks – this is a mixture of rough pasture and peat haggs. Keep going south – you’ll need to turn left at a junction of trails.

7. Plunge down a rattly descent into upper Wharfedale – resisting the temptation to make the trail any wider. After all, you don’t want your suspension to miss out on the fun, do you? At the road, turn right then accelerate to warp speed down the road to Cray. Keep your wits about you, though, as you’ll need to fork right down a beautiful, narrow lane to Hubberholme. Go over the bridge by the church and turn right at The George.

8. Follow the road as far as Raisgill and turn left by the side of a row of cottages (“No motor vehicles” sign on gate). Climb round the back of the cottages, past an incongruous summer house, onto bracken-clad slopes. This is Horse Head Moor which, if you’re tiring, will be as welcome as a present from the Mafia. Do not be ashamed to push for a bit – you need to save some juice for Foxup Moor. But no matter your weariness, you’re going to love reaching the gate on the unusually well-defined watershed. First, the views down into Littondale are crowned by a magnificent prospect of Pen-y-Ghent and Ingleborough. But, more, immediately, the descent is a gem – a heady mix of grassy ribbons, rutted swoops, rubble-rattles and stream-
splashes.

9. At the road, turn your exhilarated arse right to Foxup farm. Keep an eye for the bridleway through the gate on the left (signposted Horton). Climb up grassy pasture then zag to the right a couple of times through gates. Just after a steep climb at 450m, contour right on a narrow, grassy path.

10. Keep contouring except where a signpost invites you slightly higher to a good track skirting Plover Hill. Descend to the Horton Moor path up Pen-y-Ghent. Dink left a few metres here and the descent path will be seen – initally sketchy but improving. With first Ingleborough, then Pendle Hill as your beacon, head down to the final, blistering descent into Horton. – accompanied by a fusillade of bouncing rocks.


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Healaugh MTB

Healaugh Mountainbikeneering

Route Information

Stats: 10 miles and 1493ft of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Ample in Reeth, including some great pubs. The Dales Bike Centre does brilliant grub and has a top draw bunkhouse that is better kitted out than most B&Bs. Nuff said…just get there and ride.

Character

Setting out from Healaugh this route climbs straight away – sorry Garry. The track is however good and allows you to gain height. The initial section does lack clear signage, so be careful.

Our description should keep you on track – we get lost so that you don’t have to! After the start the track crosses moorland on it’s way to a better stony track which eventually takes you to Surrender Bridge via some fast singletrack.

It’s then a case of a slog to the top of Great Pinseat before whizzing down the twisting lose track, taking advantage of the opportunities for air. A short piece of tarmac, then across the moor again, before a fast descent to Healaugh and the Dales Bike Centre.


Route

1. From Healaugh take the road towards Gunnerside for about 200 yards before turning up right on a small lane to Birk Park as you leave the village. Climb steeply until a gated driveway to the right, signed ‘private Road’ (just before crossing the small bridge). Take this bridleway, seen in the image below and climb steadily.

2. The bridleway soon enters the moorland by a walled meadow area, with a footpath going off to the left and the bridleway staying straight ahead. Be careful here to stick to the bridleway. A short walled section of meadow leads up to Novia Scotia farm before joining a better track which in turn leads to a rocky double track. Follow this, through a small gate which leads steeply down a ravine (fully ridable in dry conditions only), crossing the stream before shouldering the bike and climbing the steep steps (mountainbikeneering) which lead to the heather moor.

3. This is initially boggy in places but eventually opens to sweet rocky singletrack (image above) that speeds you along before crossing above old lead mine ruins and down to Surrender Bridge. By now Garry and I had both been over the bars; but this was down small bogs and misjudgement.

4. From Surrender Bridge climb the rocky track that takes you up Great Pinseat to the moonscape summit. Cross the summit and descend Reeth High Moor on the twisting rocky track, letting go of the brakes and holding the seat of your pants as you grab some air on the bumps and jumps.

5. Re-joining the Langthwaite road, turn left for a short distance before leaving the road onto the bridleway to the right. This track drops down to the stream, which is crossed before the track leads you across soft moorland and along a good track which eventually hardens under the wheels and speeds you back above Novia Scotia and onto the metalled road down to Healaugh.

This steepens sharply, twisting and turning before spitting you out in the village of Healaugh.
Now time for a pub at Reeth or the Dales Bike Centre for tea and medals and some crack about this great ride.

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Grinton Moor

Grinton Moor

Route Information

Stats: 12.4 miles

OS map:

Refreshments

Reeth has ample facilities for everyone. Nearby is the top-rated Grinton Youth Hostel, but for me you can’t beat the Dales Mountain Bike Centre. Excellent accommodation, advice, and they’ll fix your bike for you as well. Stuart has a wealth of knowledge of the area.

Character

This is one of those routes that you should do as a warm down, before you head off home, having stayed at Swaledale for a weekend of biking. It will leave you with a great big grin on your face, and remind you to come back again for more of the same. It’s only the distance that stops it being classed as a hard route.


Route

1. Head out of the centre and turn right towards Grinton. Go over the bridge and as the road bends to the left, take the junction ahead, climbing the steep tarmac road all the way to the top, to open country and Grinton Youth Hostel.

2. At the Youth Hostel turn right onto the track, which soon crosses another road, and head onto the moor through a gate, keeping on the main bridleway that heads due west, across Harkerside Moor.

This rises and drops, and twists and turns on loose gravel, giving a lovely ride, with fantastic views over towards Reeth.

3. Keep on this main track all the way to a large track junction, near lead mines at Whitaside Moor. Keep left, turning uphill towards ‘Morley’s Folly’ (OS map).

4. Follow this, the ‘Apedale Road’ as it descends at speed, twisting and turning, and testing your braking modulation, all the way to a gate at ‘Dents House’ by some sheepfolds.
Southerners best Google these before setting off! They’re made of stone, very old, about a 1.7 metre in height, and they’re enclosures used for keeping sheep in. How’s that for a clue!

5. Turn left (north) and climb steadily past the line of shooting butts to old lead mining waste at the moor top (Height of Greets).

6. Pick a line through the rocky wasteland down to the the road, crossing it to the track on Cogden Moor, before finally re-joining the tarmac down to Grinton Youth Hostel.

You’ll now be warmed up for the day. Any sensible soul would have a bite to eat back at the Dales Mountain Bike Centre (down the hill you climbed at the start), before heading off for an afternoon ride.

If you’ve got a long drive ahead, then you’ll have finished off your trip with a real 3 star classic. All you now need to do is to plan the next trip.

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Grewelthorpe Loop

Grewelthorpe Loop

Route Information

Stats: 9.4 miles

OS map:

Refreshments

Grewelthorpe has an excellent pub, the Crown Inn, for a bite to eat and a pint after this ride. They also do bed and breakfast. If you’re staying long in the area, choose Masham, with excellent facilities all around, and keep this for an evening ride.

Character

This route is a superb winter night ride – so long as all the ice has cleared! The green lanes are safe and fast, and the climb up onto the moor opens up great night skies. Albeit short, it requires strength and stamina, hence the moderate rating. If done as a night ride then take a good set of lights. You’ll need at least 240 lumens as you head down from the moor. It’s a fast descent with lots of bumps. Make sure that you’re either an experienced night rider, or that you go along with somebody who is. Better still, take a helmet light and bar light of about 480 lumens, Check out the ‘Exposure’ light sets online.


Route

1. Cycle from the village pub, going up the hill to the left for about 150 yards to a junction. Turn right into the lane and follow this keeping left and heading out to Foulgate Farm.

2. At the farm head straight on and steeply down the rough track at speed as is twists and turns.

3. A sharp turn left at the bottom takes you through a ford (don’t fall here in winter!) and rises steeply immediately on leaving the water. Then begins a grind up the green lane for some distance before meeting tarmac.

4. Keep straight on at the road and head for the bridleway, joining the track across the moor as the road turns sharp left.

5. Continue the climb on the rocky track, through the gate and after about 1 mile a track to the right speeds you downhill with exhilaration.

6. As this track meets the road at Ilton, head straight on towards a junction right at Ilton Grange Farm.

7. Keep on straight ahead until the bridleway heads left at Blackhill House, taking you down and back to Foulgate Farm. Take the lane back to Grewelthorpe and refreshments at the Inn!
If you look at the elevation profile, you’ll notice that this is a 3 miles descent to finish. Just remind yourself of this as you do the initial climbs!

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Dent to Hawes

Dent to Hawes

Route Information

Stats: 23 miles,  2,915 feet of ascent

OS Map:

Refreshments

Sportsman’s Inn at Cowgill, in Wensleydale, there’s Moira Metcalfe’s studio at Appersett or mosey into Hawes, especially for the Penny Garth Cafe.

Character

An excellent loop straddling the main watershed of Northern England. The initial climb is brawny but surprisingly do-able and both big descents are to-die-from.

If you think there’s an excess of tarmac in the second half, you can embroider the route with extra loops up Cotterdale, Cotter End (descending from Hell Gill Bridge) and Grisedale. You could even trundle further west to pick up the bridleway from Dandra Garth back to Cowgill.


Route

1. There’s a tiny layby on the left (facing upstream) just before the Sportsman’s Inn with room for only one car.

2. The bridleway up Arten Gill leaves on the left at the chicane over the stream.

3. Climb. Further description is redundant.

4. At the top of the heave, turn right on the Pennine Bridleway, starting on gravel but leading to grassy cruising.

5. Turn left at the minor road then cross the Newby Top Road to gain the PBW signposted to Cold Keld Gate.

6. Turn left on the Cam Road and then fork left on the Pennine Way. Cruise along the rim of the more-impressive-than-it-sounds hollow of Snaizeholme. At the fork, bear left down a magnificent cobble-fest alongside the Tunguska’d plantation on the left (May 2013). If you’re still in the saddle when you reach the road, congratulate yourself.

7. Turn left on the PBW signposted to Thorney Mire House.

8. Turn right on the road to Appersett, then left on the Sedbergh road.

9. Near the Moorcock Inn, take the PBW signposted to Garsdale Station.

10. Haul up the Coal Road, then fork left at the top to cruise back to the top of Arten Gill.

11. Plummet. No further description is needed.




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Dallowgill

Dallowgill

Route Information

Stats: 25.5 miles

OS Map:

Refreshments

For me the best spot is indeed Masham. Ample accommodation, places to eat and drink. On the way around, Lofthouse provides suitable liquid refreshments at the excellent Crown Hotel. Their food is also superb – but a steep climb will follow, so take it easy.

Dallowgill, near Masham (parking for Mossaic Trail). From Dallowgill village drive along and take the road left and over the moor marked ‘unsuitable for motor vehicles’. Head up the narrow road and locate the parking to the right. Slightly farther ahead, a more picturesque spot exists by a small waterfall. The latter parking spot knocks over a mile off the round trip and makes it a better finish, without any tarmac . This is an excellent ride, with a easy incline to begin, followed by a superb descent on a rocky bridleway.

Character

The views are spectacular as the routes crosses moorland tracks and rises and falls with spectacular descents being the reward for hard climbing all day long.
Have a break and a bite to eat at the pub in Lofthouse before climbing back up on the edge and a superb finish to an excellent ride.


Route

1. Ride up the road and onto the moorland track eventually meeting a gate. The track now descends on rocky loose gravel to a junction with a bridleway to the right.
2. Turn right and follow this until the track splits. Take the right hand fork.

3. Continue up a steady climb until a ‘T’ junction of tracks. Turn left and head towards Lofthouse, keeping right at the next major track junction and head to the tarmac road.

4. Crossing the road, take the bridleway which stays up high above the valley edge and follow this around the valley, up several small climbs and descents and through a series of gates.

5. As Scar House Reservoir comes into view and you see the car park away off to your left in the distance, the moorland track decsends extremely steeply on loose gravel. Take care with speed and brakes at this point, and save your energy for the climb out!

6. A final descent takes you down to the reservoir and the track is followed around the reservoir and over the Angram dam wall, turning left and following the tarmac road to the picnic spot and car park.

7. Just before the toilet block a track heads up on the right. This is steep, loose and twisty, but opens up on the top to a glorious descent along Moor Lane to Middlesmoor, through the village, joining the road to Lofthouse.

8. At Lofthouse head up the road signed Masham, where at the top of the climb a bridleway to the right heads off back to Dallowgill.

9. Keep to the right hand track until familiar ground brings you to the first track junction. Head up the climb and back to Dallowgill.
Enjoy a refreshing break by the waterfall and stream.



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